Identity Theft And The Dead

Identity theft is on the rise and this disturbing trend will only increase in the years ahead.

Every year, 10 million American consumers and businesses experience identity theft that costs about $50 billion of dollars and about 175 hours (per incident) to resolve the matter. It is impossible to calculate the cost of the stress, aggravation and fear many experience when their identity, or the identity of a loved one, has been compromised.

The obituary page of your local newspaper has always been a valuable resource for identity thieves. In our quest to create a meaningful and unique tribute to a loved one, we frequently tell the world much more than is necessary by providing very detailed biographical data about the person who has died.

Most newspapers in the United States now offer their readers an online version of their publication. With the introduction of RSS feeds, the information that was once delivered to communities of varying sizes is now broadcast to the world within hours.

Here are some practical tips to help you protect the identity of a loved one who was died:

1) IMMEDIATELY notify the Social Security Administration of the death. Click here to be taken to the Social Security web site.

2) IMMEDIATELY notify all three credit reporting agencies of the death. Below you will find their names, telephone numbers, and links to their web sites.

3) IMMEDIATELY gather and secure checkbooks, credit cards, credit card statements, savings passbooks, and bank statements and keep them in one place.

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Published on September 29, 2007 at 7:56 pm  Leave a Comment  

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